2 of 365 (MN_WBS 2015)

2015-01-02

2 of 365
2015_01_02

Matt Niebuhr
West Branch Studio
www.mattniebuhr.com
shop.mattniebuhr.com

iphonography + instagramography = diptychliscous

Marco Breuer – unique / process / photography

Marco Breuer, German, born 1966
Pan (C-362), c. 2005
Chromogenic paper, scratched
Courtesy Von Lintel Gallery, New York

“He makes unique works of art in a medium known for its multiple editions.” And I would add – makes work that explores the results of experimenting with process – also something that is unique to the medium – photography.   Resource=New Pictures Blog – MIA

NOTE:  Goal: I’m going to re-invest my time / effort in some way with this personal archive of notes – in the meantime – what started as a trickle has become a more active stream over here: though the focus is more on drawing / art / personal work.  What I want to do is to re-visit certain notes now that some time has passed – my feelings / and knowledge have changed over time so it is good to revisit notes / revise what needs to be…  “stay tuned”…

Gerry Badger @ Blue Sky Gallery – Portland, OR

What I hope to be an interesting first person presentation, from the author of “the Pleasures of Good Photographs” (previous podcasts) a gallery talk about “Berlin” during Blue Sky’s Birthday Open House at 2:35 PM on Saturday, October 9, 2010.

But, be there early 1:35PM  to see / hear about Stella Johnson’s black-and-white series, “Al Sol,”

A lot to see and contemplate!

Noriko Furunishi – constructed texture of place

Noriko Furunishi .  “…how [the] images end up don’t really exist but, the texture and place exists [in the image]…”

The image of the human being within the landscape is of course important feedback on scale and helps the “viewer / audience” place themselves within the imagined context – a surrogate of sorts I suppose.

Noriko Furunishi Untitled (Rock), 2006 C-Print

Noriko Furunishi
Untitled (Rock), 2006
C-Print
edition of 10
40 x 30 inches  (image via: Murry Guy)

Consider how different landscapes appear though with and without human scale – an overt occupation.   We (as viewers) project a lot with regard to our own physical understanding and sense of size, scale and measure with the inclusion of the human figure within the image – almost as an aid to imagining ourselves with-in the image – a way into the picture…

What I like about Furunishi’s pictures is that odd sense of vertigo – something about comparing what I expect the landscape to look like – what if feels to be in the landscape – by this I mean feet on the ground -standing and perhaps looking out over the horizon….  and what the landscape scene looks like as imagined by Furunishi.

Link to an interview with Noriko Furunishi and a blog on past exhibitsMIA (Minneapolis Institue of Art) and the  MIA’s “New Pictures” feature….  great stuff and worth the time to browse.  Nice to see the work get more exposure and to see new work!

Previous post of mine on Furunishi work that I found interesting via Blind Spot

Olaf Otto Becker at Blue Sky Gallery

Ilulissat Icefjord 09 07/2003 by Olaf Otto Becker

Ilulissat Icefjord 09, 07/2003 by Olaf Otto Becker

I’ve enjoyed viewing the work of Olaf Otto Becker albeit previously through online web work and so I jumped at the opportunity to visit the current (January 2010) hanging at Blue Sky Gallery here in Portland, Oregon.  As always, it is good to see the work in person and it was time well spent.  The work from his series “Broken Line,” is shot in Greenland with 8″ x 10″ camera and the results are as expected loaded with fine crisp detail and a rich pallet of colors.  The prints hanging are “modest” in size at 25″ x 30″ and with the fine detail I found myself practically nose up to the prints in an attempt to take it all in.

579 Oquaatsut, 07/2003 69°20’23’’ N, 51°00’15’’ W by Olaf Otto Becker

579 Oquaatsut, 07/2003
69°20’23’’ N, 51°00’15’’ W by Olaf Otto Becker

705 Nuussuag 07/2006 by Olaf Otto Becker

705 Nuussuag 07/2006 by Olaf Otto Becker

What I found most interesting in terms of viewing the pictures is with a personal question about the problem of describing “a place” through photographs. In this case what sort of impression does Becker’s characterization through pictures of “place” in Greenland leave behind?

Becker’s photographs as assembled in the show reveal a balance between what I would call “natural beauty” as pictured in the more decorative photographs of icebergs and sculpted bays with the images of resident cabins, outbuildings and associated detritus of human inhabitation.  I recall about a 2/3 to 1/3 distribution with natural beauty leading the way…

The pictures of human habitation at first seem to me to keep to a neutral presentation – meaning my assumptions are that the images are simply “what can be found”.  The pictures seperately do not seem to convey an explicit indictment but when coupled together with overtly beautiful images of a potentially devastating environmental situation to me alludes to a larger question of how we choose to live in our surroundings. The human places pictured indicate to me a pretty ugly disregard and disordered inhabitation.  Of course this is completely my own conjecture, but the pictures of local inhabitation chosen to be pictured are what I would call beautiful pictures of ugly things and by transference, I begin to recognize how the “Broken Line” may be much more revealing in general about how we inhabit places and is therefor much more than simply pretty pictures of icebergs. Of course it’s a pretty big jump and a lot of transference to allow the inhabited pictures to speak about “human disregard” of the landscape… but I think it’s there none-the-less.

Thinking about the problem of keeping a body of work together in order to convey (potentially) an intent held within a group of pictures is a problem probably best solved by the photo book – the book containing these pictures The Broken Line by Becker presumably may hold some more answers.  I have not yet had a chance to see the book – but am curious to see if my intuition and assumptions might play out in the book…

Talerua Bay, 07/2005 by Olaf Otto Becker

Talerua Bay, 07/2005 by Olaf Otto Becker

This relates to a couple of posts as well on the potential value of a photobook as a reference item for collectors and is blog and post worth visiting as it is quite nicely elaborated upon by DLK collectors offering another point of view.  The photobook posts might explain a bit more regarding Becker’s work from the same DLK collectors on the new series “Above Zero”….  All of this make me wonder more about the question of “decorative” work as a hook to bring a larger audience towards work that ultimately wants to be more than just beautiful…

Brad Moore – photography

I’ve been following some great photography work by Brad Moore – I think this work shows an extraordinary constraint and edit.

Vista Belta, Wimington, CA by Brad Moore

Vista Belta, Wimington, CA by Brad Moore

Also receiving alcolades from Lens Culture among many others…

Notable for making the cut at Photolucida, Critical Mass 2009 portfolio reviews: Congratulations to this year’s Critical Mass Top 50 – 2009. I think his work would be great to see in book form!  Let’s hope the work is considered for this – as a have appreciated many of the fine books put together by Photolucida which can be found here: http://www.wmjasco.com/photolucida/photolucida.html

Happy Kids Nutrition by Brad Moore

Happy Kids Nutrition by Brad Moore

I’ve appreciated Moore’s work for some time – especially the surburban landscape themed photographs – as written previously in this post. It would be terrific to see a group of this work presented at Blue Sky Gallery here in Portland…  Maybe someday soon!

Theme: Looking closely (at rocks)

Juergen Bergbauer: 42 Studien (Print Detail) Installation virtual 2008

42 Studien (Print Detail)
Installation virtual 2008 – JÜRGEN BERGBAUER

I first came across JÜRGEN BERGBAUER earlier this year through a 5b4 –review of Bergbauer’s book: Studien nach der Natur – which I see has made a “best of 2009 book list” on 5b4.  I wrote about my interest here in a previous entry

Bergbauer’s project – Studies after Nature” has been on my mind off and on for quite a while now.  In Bergbauer’s work – the “final” images are constructed out of an archive of objects – specifcally found objects (rocks) – from the roadside according to the artist statement.  The “studies” of the archive are arranged in various patterns of which I’m unsure of (or if) there may be an underlying organizing structure – outside of an aesthetic judgement and arrangement although the constructions do appear to be bound to a sense of gravity.  None the less the resulting constructions are I think quite beautiful – but also quite artificial – and deliberate – full of patterns hinting at structural issues – yet not really resolving them in my opinion. I’m also quite amazed (although admittedly it looks too laborious) at the amount of apparent work done to “catalogue” all of the pieces which are incorporated in to the final studies…

Untitled (basalt - East Central Oregon) 2009 - Matt Niebuhr
Untitled (basalt – East Central Oregon) 2009 – Matt Niebuhr

On my own road trip this summer, I came across a section of land by the roadside in East Central Oregon, that I have one image thus far that gets me very excited to explore further but with a different approach.

What I’m intrigued by is natural dazzle of that which can be found out in the world (by anyone) as determined by the forces of nature – just by looking carefully or deliberately.  This is a theme that I am beginning to be able to discern as a thread in a number of photo studies I’m working.  Here, the fractures of basalt arranged according to natural laws – the horizontal fissures describing the shifting forces inside the earth – reminders that the solid ground beneath is not still.  I’ve collected a few shards of basalt and the shapes that are revealed in these shards amaze me.  I’m looking forward to trying to document these shards in a meaningful way.  And then, I’m really looking forward to the next road trip back to eastern Oregon.